print logo

11806 Mercy Blvd.
Savannah, GA 31419
912-921-8926



Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

A stenotic aortic valve is narrowed causing restricting blood flow from the heart and increasing the potential for heart failure.

For high-risk patients and those who are not suitable for open-heart surgery, another option is now available. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement, or TAVR, is a less invasive approach to implanting an artificial heart valve inside a stenotic aortic valve, and the procedure does not require open-heart surgery.

Research shows that high-risk patients who undergo TAVR have improved heart function, survival rates, and quality of life compared to patients who do not receive a new valve and chose to continue with standard medical therapy including medication to treat the aortic stenosis and/or a procedure to stretch the opening of the aortic valve.

During the valve replacement procedure, the surgeon inserts a catheter through an artery in the groin or a small incision between the ribs. The new, artificial valve is advanced through the catheter until it reaches the diseased aortic valve. A balloon expands the artificial valve within the patient's aortic valve and then the catheter is removed. The new valve replaces the old, resulting in increased blood flow throughout the body.

Transcatheter techniques decreases the need for a bypass machine and its associated risks since the surgeon is able to perform the valve replacement procedure while the patient's heart is still beating.

St. Joseph's/Candler Smart Living

Dr. Neravetla was recently interviewed about new hybrid ORs. Read an excerpt from the article below.

Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

A stenotic aortic valve is narrowed causing restricting blood flow from the heart and increasing the potential for heart failure.

For high-risk patients and those who are not suitable for open-heart surgery, another option is now available. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement, or TAVR, is a less invasive approach to implanting an artificial heart valve inside a stenotic aortic valve, and the procedure does not require open-heart surgery.

Research shows that high-risk patients who undergo TAVR have improved heart function, survival rates, and quality of life compared to patients who do not receive a new valve and chose to continue with standard medical therapy including medication to treat the aortic stenosis and/or a procedure to stretch the opening of the aortic valve.

During the valve replacement procedure, the surgeon inserts a catheter through an artery in the groin or a small incision between the ribs. The new, artificial valve is advanced through the catheter until it reaches the diseased aortic valve. A balloon expands the artificial valve within the patient's aortic valve and then the catheter is removed. The new valve replaces the old, resulting in increased blood flow throughout the body.

Transcatheter techniques decreases the need for a bypass machine and its associated risks since the surgeon is able to perform the valve replacement procedure while the patient's heart is still beating.

St. Joseph's/Candler Smart Living

Dr. Neravetla was recently interviewed about new hybrid ORs. Read an excerpt from the article below.